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Why we remember

In an age with 24-hour news cycles, it can be easy to forget what happened yesterday, let alone what happened in our city in 2012. On Feb.
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In an age with 24-hour news cycles, it can be easy to forget what happened yesterday, let alone what happened in our city in 2012.

On Feb. 24, 2012, Airdrie RCMP attended a home in Bayside to check on the well-being of 33-year-old Andrea Conroy, after neighbours hadn’t seen her in days.

Upon entry, police found Conroy dead in her home. Autopsy results showed the Airdrie mother died of multiple stab wounds. Police said she was killed by her boyfriend Rick Doucette, who was later discovered dead by an apparent suicide.

Family violence continues to occur in our city. Recent statistics indicated the issue is growing in Airdrie. An assessment report presented to Airdrie City council in May 2017 revealed the city’s domestic violence rate had risen to 3.9 per cent above the provincial average.

According to a Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics report released in 2017, Alberta has seen a two per cent increase in family violence since 2014. Currently, this province ranks third highest in Canada for its rate of intimate partner violence, as well as for its rate of family violence against seniors.

The people impacted by family violence are why we remember, why the community continues to raise funds in Conroy’s name.

We encourage everyone who is able to participate in or donate to the Legacy Run to End Family Violence.

If you are impacted by family violence contact the Family Violence Info Line at 403-310-1818.





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