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Crossfield community getting kids into the garden

Children were invited to plant their very first seeds and kick off the growing season May 20 at the Vista Crossing community garden in Crossfield.
Planting at the Vista Crossing community garden was postponed until May 20 to avoid potential frost-over. The growing season is now underway with special plots for children.
Planting at the Vista Crossing community garden was postponed until May 20 to avoid potential frost-over. The growing season is now underway with special plots for children.

Children were invited to plant their very first seeds and kick off the growing season May 20 at the Vista Crossing community garden in Crossfield.

Throughout the summer, residents are welcomed to come learn about gardening and watch as the plots grows.

“It’s one thing to physically build a community, it’s another thing to actually ‘build community,’” said Michael Tandara, director of marketing for Western Canada Land and Housing at Dream Unlimited, the developers behind Vista Crossing.

The garden is one in a string of initiatives organized by Dream Unlimited to help residents connect, feel comfortable and get kids into gardening, Tandara said.

He added it’s part of the overall goal to make gardening less intimidating and more accessible for everyone, while not demanding commitment.

“No one wants to walk into a gym because they’re worried they’ll get signed up to a year membership,” Tandara said.

Community plots are reserved for Vista Crossing residents early in the year, while others are reserved for children in the community. Anything leftover can book a spot at Vista Crossing’s welcome centre.

Kids will meet every second Tuesday – starting June 5 – to tend to their plot, where they will be watering, weeding and learning about other garden care. Crafts or speakers are planned for each session until its end in September.

Plots aren’t guaranteed for community members outside of Vista Crossing, and if you missed a spot, you won’t be apart of the growing period, Tandara said. However, he added the garden is publicly accessible, and anyone can attend to gather information for their own garden.

“From the perspective of residents gardening together, it gives them the opportunity to get tips, good ideas and just be outdoors,” Tandara said. “For kids, it’s an opportunity to have people help them get into it, and maybe grow a fondness of that themselves.”

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