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Editorial: Child care

It's great to see the Alberta government finally work with the federal government to finalize a deal on subsidized child care. Now, it's up to the federal government to deliver on the initiative.
Airdrie Our View_text

It's great to see the Alberta government finally agree with the federal government on a deal for subsidized child care. Now, it's up to the federal government to deliver on the initiative.

Premier Jason Kenney and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were in Edmonton Nov. 15 to announce the historic $3.8 billion deal, which will ultimately culminate in bringing $10-a-day child care to Canadian parents earning less than $120,000 annually by 2026. (Families with higher annual incomes will pay more than $10 a day, depending on their salaries).

While Alberta held out and is one of the last provincial governments to sign on with the federal government plan for subsidized child care, it's nice to see the stalemate finally come to a conclusion.

Cheaper child care was Trudeau's main campaign promise in the recent federal election. As someone who has not always delivered on his platform promises in the past (see election reform) it's crucial for Trudeau and the Liberal Party of Canada to deliver on the child-care front, if they want to remain in government for long.

Child care is one of the most expensive services new parents pay for, with licensed companies in Calgary and Edmonton charging an average of more than $1,200 a month per child, according to the 2019 Child Care Fee Survey. This new deal means many parents will pay less than a quarter of that in the future, or about $285 per month. By the end of next year, fees for licensed child-care spaces are set to be cut in half, according to the announcement.  

Child Care Now Alberta (CCNA), an advocacy group for parents seeking less expensive child care, said the deal feels like an early Christmas present. In a CTV Calgary story, CCNA chair Susan Cake and parent Roshni McCartney said the deal will particularly benefit mothers who previously had to forego their careers to be a stay-at-home parent, as working while paying for child care did not always make financial sense.

 

 


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