Skip to content

Bragg Creek-area campground aims to provide unique and educational experience

The Onespot Crossing Campground northwest of Bragg Creek is not only a quiet place to rest and relax on your next outdoor adventure, but somewhere to learn, experience and support Indigenous culture, right on lands owned by the Tsuut’ina First Nation.

The Onespot Crossing Campground northwest of Bragg Creek is not only a quiet place to rest and relax on your next outdoor adventure, but somewhere to learn, experience and support Indigenous culture, right on lands owned by the Tsuut’ina First Nation.

“Everybody is welcome here. We’re here to share and we’re here to educate everybody on our culture,” said Ginger Onespot, who owns and operates the campground alongside her husband David.

Onespot said the land was David’s home for 53 years and the campground came about after the family decided to sell their cattle and offer a unique experience to visitors. The goal is to connect patrons – especially younger visitors – with nature, and aid them in learning about Indigenous heritage and practices.

“We opened [the campground] up for the kids. We want them to enjoy nature and come back to nature,” she said.

Onespot Crossing welcomes campers in tents and trailers – although there is no power or water hook-up just yet. However, Onespot said plans are in the works to introduce those amenities to the campground in the near future.

Anyone interested in an authentic camping experience can rent a teepee to spend the night in, accompanied by a few loads of firewood to cook with and keep warm. Visitors may also catch a glimpse of the buffalo who call the grounds home during their time at Onespot Crossing.

Supplementing the camping experience, the first Onespot Market was held outdoors on Aug. 8, and the campground’s plan is to host local and Indigenous artisans every Sunday until the weather cools down. A show-and-shine was also held on the weekend at the campground, which is set to host numerous other events throughout the seasons.

Onespot said the addition of the market this year is another way to highlight the work of Indigenous creators and give them a platform to share and sell their wares.

Following the market and show-and-shine, she said the first annual healing celebration powwow will be held by the Onespot family on the grounds from Aug. 13 to 15. Onespot added the public is welcome to join in on the celebration, which will include singing, dancing, food and an open market. Guests are welcome from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, noon to 8 p.m. Saturday and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Sunday. 

“We want to just celebrate and show our people our dancing and singing,” she said.

In the future, Onespot said there are also plans to host Indigenous culture and outdoor awareness classes at the campground, as a way to further educate younger generations on the sacred traditions and practices of local Indigenous peoples.

Those interested in participating in the weekly markets and other future events can email redlineamltd@gmail.com for registration.

The campground can also be found on Facebook, Instagram, and their website, onespotcrossing.com.

Be the first to read breaking stories. Allow browser notifications on your device. What are browser notifications?
No thanks